Publications

  • May 2016

    A blueprint for breakthroughs
    Federally funded education research in 2016 and beyond
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    By Michael B. Horn and Julia Freeland Fisher
    The federal government funds a significant proportion of education research in the United States. But these research efforts have, by and large, fallen short of delivering on the promise to drive individual student outcomes across the country. This white paper charts how the federal government can boost the productivity of future efforts by altering the priorities of education research to embrace a more complete research cycle.

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  • March 2016

    Disrupting law school
    How disruptive innovation will revolutionize the legal world
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    By Michele R. Pistone and Michael B. Horn
    Law schools are growing increasingly out of step with shifts in the legal services market and are facing dramatic declines in enrollment, revenue, and job placement for graduates. Coupled with recent changes in licensure policy and the disruption of higher education in general, law schools’ inability to innovate has created a perfect storm for disruption. This white paper explores the severe vulnerability of law schools and outlines potential steps forward for university administrators, entrepreneurs, and policymakers.

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  • October 2015

    State of opportunity
    The status and direction of blended learning in Ohio
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    In early 2015, we teamed up with the Ohio Blended Learning Network and The Learning Accelerator to conduct a statewide survey for the purpose of providing an overview of the blended-learning environment in Ohio. This paper summarizes the survey results and provides some brief observations and recommendations for schools in Ohio and beyond.

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  • September 2015

    Schools as community hubs
    Integrating support services to drive educational outcomes
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    By Michael B. Horn, Julia Freeland, and Stuart M. Butler
    Published by the Brookings Institution, this paper explores the importance of designing schools to address nonacademic challenges, as well as to help all students learn.

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  • September 2015

    Proof points
    Blended learning success in school districts
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    We teamed up with the Evergreen Education Group to publish 12 case studies of how traditional school districts improved student learning outcomes after implementing blended learning. Each short profile highlights key details in the district’s blended-learning strategy, the EdTech products used, and promising results in the form of test scores and graduation rates.

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  • August 2015

    Moving beyond college
    Rethinking higher education regulation for an unbundled world
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    By Michael B. Horn and Andrew P. Kelly
    New “unbundled” higher education providers are constrained by the regulatory system’s reliance on the traditional bundled model. Published by the American Enterprise Institute, this policy brief outlines potential regulatory approaches and tools that policymakers could use to facilitate access to this unbundled market while protecting consumers and taxpayers.

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  • June 2015

    The educator’s dilemma
    When and how schools should embrace poverty relief
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    By Michael B. Horn and Julia Freeland
    For decades, school reformers and poverty relief advocates have argued about what it takes to close the achievement gap. Some scholars, like Abigail and Stephen Thernstrom, argue that school-based interventions are the most promising solution. Others, like Richard Rothstein, argue that schools are not the most efficient platform for fighting the effects of poverty and that society could better help low-income students succeed in school by spending scarce dollars on programs that target children’s health and well-being. With the aid of sound theory, the theory of interdependence and modularity, we can see that both sides are right—and that both are also wrong.

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