Getting Smart: Why youth need social capital

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September 28, 2018

In a recent podcast interview with Tom Vander Ark of Getting Smart, Julia Freeland Fisher spoke on the topic of “Why youth need social capital and how schools can help”. Although research shows that over half of all jobs in the US are earned with the benefit of a personal connection, our schools today are not designed to help students foster relationships that could support them along their paths to college and career.

Julia shares how educators can start to use edtech to connect students to mentors, experts, and peers in meaningful ways. She walks listeners through three main categories of emerging innovations that connect students in new ways: fully online relationships; online platforms that coordinate offline relationships; and connections as part of integrated student supports. The conversation highlights the value that these types of tools can provide for students both in the short- and long-term, and encourages us to imagine: what would the design of a more networked, caring school look like? And how can we begin to aim toward building social capital for all students?

Listen to this riveting discussion on the Getting Smart Podcast and check out Julia’s new book, Who You Know: Unlocking innovations that expand students’ networks.

To check out the original site, including a full transcript of the podcast, click here.

Julia is the director of education research at the Clayton Christensen Institute. She leads a team that educates policymakers and community leaders on the power of disruptive innovation in the K-12 and higher education spheres. Be sure to check out her new book, "Who You Know: Unlocking Innovations That Expand Students' Networks" https://amzn.to/2RIqwOk.